Top 10 alternative media sites

The legacy mainstream media is dying and rightfully so. If you want the truth in today's super-charged political environment, the last place you're going to find it is on the boob-tube, nor will you hear it on the radio or read it in a mainstream publication. That leaves the World Wide Web and, as with the mainstream media, so too is the WWW full of crap, but there are many diamonds among the noise.

Keep in mind that no one person or organization gets it right all the time. I've been watching an average of around 70+ alternative news sources for a couple decades and i'm constantly adding and removing sources as i gain a sense of their overall credibility. I have yet to come across a resource that's anywhere near perfect.

The only reasonable way i can keep track of new content being published on so many websites is by utilizing their RSS/news feeds using a news feed reader which compiles all of the updated content in one place. For more about news feeds and my preferred news feed reader, see How to access RSS feeds for websites that don't advertise one.

Here's my personal list of the top 10 alternative news resources in no particular order. In all cases where they have a YouTube channel, i highly suggest subscribing to an alternative platform if they use on one. For even more of my alternative news picks, see "Fake News" sources worth reading.

The Corbett Report, run by James Corbett, is one of my favorite sources of unique content and commentary. Along with James Evan Pilato of Media Monarchy, the two James' broadcast regular video podcasts including the weekly New World Next Week episodes in which they address several of the current top stories, as well as the annual New World Next Year episodes in which they predict future trends and events. A solid, in-depth researcher, James has also produced several hard-hitting documentary and short films including 9/11: A Conspiracy Theory, a five minute parody video that does an excellent job of challenging the official government narrative regarding the 2001 terrorist attack upon the U.S..

Ben Swann / Truth in Media is a long-time investigative journalist and former producer of 'Reality Check' on FOX 19. Ben is well known for the Reality Check segment on 'Pizzagate' which involves child sex trafficing among the worlds "elite". The only problem with Ben is that there aren't 10,000 more of him.

Blackstone Intelligence Network by Jake Morphonios is an extraordinarily good source of news and commentary regarding Israel, Zionism, the middle east, financial crimes, human trafficking, recent events and much more. Jake has worked for the Ron Paul campaign, as well as campaigns for other candidates, and apparently has a substantial network of insider sources.

Helen of desTroy (Helen Buyniski) publishes articles and insightful commentary on a variety of topics including the police state, foreign policy, surveillance, propaganda, and immigration. Many of her articles have appeared on RT.

Project Veritas, founded by James O'Keefe, uses traditional undercover investigative journalism to record and effectively expose blatant corruption in the government and corporate sectors.

Truthstream Media, run by Aaron and Melissa Dykes, is dedicated to waking up the masses which they accomplish by publishing entertaining and provocative short and documentary videos covering a wide variety of subjects.

21st Century Wire is a North American and Europe-based, grass-roots, independent hyper blog offering bold news, views and media analysis, working with a core team of writers, researchers, and an array of volunteer contributors who write and help to analyze news and provide a diverse perspective and opinions from around the world. 21st Century Wire writers have appeared internationally on TV, radio and in print, as well as keynote speakers at leading alternative conferences and events.

Cory's Digs "was created by Investigative Journalist Corey Lynn for the purpose of digging for truth in a world where nothing is as it seems, then connecting the dots and presenting her findings to you. Corey focuses on larger webs and nests, and areas that are seldom covered by mainstream media. She exposes operations, oftentimes with detailed timelines, maps, and documentation to provide the full scope of what may be transpiring, and she always cites sources with links to back it up."

Really Graceful, aka Internet Friends, is run by a very nice young lady who researches various interesting topics which she covers in short and entertaining videos. Many of her videos are about occult subjects while others are about recent notable events.

Ron Paul Liberty Report focuses on U.S. foreign policy and finance and other issues that affect our everyday lives.

Got something to say? Publish it on 12bytes.org!

A lot of people today don't have a web presence outside of social media. If you have something to say and you want it published on a proper platform, i invite you to submit your work for which you will of course be given full credit.

For details, please see the Contribute page.

Link Rot: How to find new sources for busted links

[otb_postinfo]

There are a variety of ways to find what you're looking for when you come across a broken link on the interwebs. Here's a few methods i like to use.

Search operators

The first thing you should know is how to use a search engine. Various search engines will attach a special meaning to certain characters and these 'search operators' as they're called can be really helpful. Here's some handy examples that work for Google as well as some other search engines (and no, you shouldn't be using Google directly):

OR : 'OR', or the pipe ( | ) character, tells the search engine you want to search for this OR that. For example cat|dog will return results containing 'cat' or 'dog', as will cat OR dog.

( ) : Putting words in a group separated by OR or | produces the same result as just described, however you can then add words outside of the group that you always want to see in the results. For example, (red|pink|orange) car will return results that have red, pink or orange cars.

" ": If you wrap a "word" in double quotes, you are telling the search engine that the word is really important. If you wrap multiple words in double quotes, you are telling the search engine to look for pages containing "that exact phrase."

site: : If you want to search only a particular domain, such as 12bytes.org, append site:12bytes.org to your query, or don't include any search terms if you want it to return a list of pages for the domain. You can do the same when preforming an image search if you want to see all the images on a domain. You can also search a TLD (Top-Level Domain) using this operator. For example, to search the entire .gov TLD, just append site:.gov to your query.

-: If you prefix a word with a -hyphen, you are telling the search engine to omit results containing this word. You can do the same -"with a phrase" also.

cache:: Prefixing a domain with cache:, such as cache:12bytes.org, will return the most recent cached version of a page.

intitle: : If you prefix a word or phase with intitle:, you are telling the search engine that the word or phrase must be contained in the titles of the results.

allintitle: : Words prefixed with allintitle: tells the search engine that all words following this operator must be contained in the titles of the search results.

See this page for more examples.

Searching the archives

One of the simplest methods of finding the original target of a busted link is to copy the link location (right click the link and select 'Copy Link Location') and plug that into one of the web archive services. The two most popular, general archives that i'm aware of are the Internet Archive and Archive.is. The Internet Archive provides options to filter your search results for particular types of content, such as web pages, videos, etc.. In either case, just paste the copied link in the input field they provide and press your Enter key. If the link is 'dirty', cleaning it up may provide better results. For example, let's say the link is something like:

http://example.com/articles/1995/that-dog-dont-hunt?ref=example.com&partner=sombody&utm_source=google

The archive may not return any results for the URL, but it might if you clean it up by removing everything after 'hunt'.

There are also web browser extensions you can install to make accessing the archive services easier. For Firefox i like the View Page Archive & Cache add-on by 'Armin Sebastian'. When you find a dead link, just right-click it and from the 'View Page Archive' context menu you can select to search all of the enabled archives or just a specific one. Even if the page isn't dead you can right-click in the page and retrieve a cached copy or archive the page yourself. Another cool feature of this add-on is that it will place an icon in the address bar if you land on a dead page and you can just search for an archived version from the icon context menu.

Of these two services, the Internet Archive has a far more extensive library, but there's a very annoying caveat with it that defeats the purpose of an archive which is why i much prefer Archive.is. The Internet Archive follows robot.txt directives. I won't go into why i think this is stupid, suffice to say that content that is stored on the Internet Archive can be removed even if it does not break any of their rules.

Dead links and no clues

If all you have is a dead link with no title or description and you can't find a cached copy in one of the archives, you may still be able to find copy of the document somewhere. For example let's say the link is https://example.com/pages/my-monkey-stole-my-car.html. The likely title of the document you're looking for is right in the URL -- my-monkey-stole-my-car -- and you can plug that into a search engine just as it is, or remove the hyphens and wrap the title in double quotes to perform a phrase search. Also see some of the other examples here.

Dead links with some clues

If you come across a dead link that has a title or description, but isn't cached in an archive, you can use that to perform a search. Just select the title, or a short but unique phrase from the description (which preferably doesn't contain any punctuation), then wrap it in double quotes and perform a phrase search.

Dead internal website links

If you encounter a website that contains a broken link to another page on the same site and you have some information about the document, like a title or excerpt, you can do a domain search to see if a search engine may link to a working copy. For example, let's assume the title of the page we're looking for is 'Why does my kitten hate me?' on the domain 'example.com'. Copy the title, wrap it in double quotes and plug it into a search engine that supports phrase searches, add a space, then append site:example.com. This will tell the search engine to look for results only on example.com. Also see some of the other examples here.

YouTube videos you know exist but can't find

Because there is a remarkable amount of censorship taking place at YouTube, they will sometimes hide sensitive videos from their search results when you use the search engine provided by YouTube. To get around this, use another search engine to perform a domain search as described in the 'Dead internal website links' section.

Deleted videos

In some cases, such as with a link that points to a removed YouTube video, you may not have any information other than the URL itself, not even a page title. Using the YouTube link as an example, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abc123xyz, copy youtube.com/watch?v=abc123xyz, wrap it in double quotes and plug that into your preferred search engine. You will often find a forum or blog post somewhere that will provide helpful clues, such as the video title or description which you can use to search for a working copy of the video. And the first place to look for deleted YouTube videos is YouTube! You can also search the Internet Archive as well as other video platforms that are more censorship resistant than YouTube, including Dailymotion, BitChute, DTube, LEEKWire and many others.

Broken links on your own website

I don't know about you, but i have nearly 4,000 links on 12bytes.org as of this writing and many of them point to resources which TPTB (The Powers That [shouldn't] Be) would rather you knew nothing about. As such, many of the resources i link to are taken down and so i have to deal with broken links constantly, many of them deleted YouTube videos. If you run WordPress (self-hosted - i don't know about a wordpress.com site) you will find Broken Link Checker by 'ManageWP' in the WordPress plugin repository and it's job is to constantly scan your site to look for broken links. While it is not a bug-free plugin (the developer is not at all responsive and doesn't seem to fix anything in a timely manner), it is by far the most comprehensive tool of its type that i'm aware of. There are also many external services you could use whether you run WordPress or not.

Articles

Jump to: Investigations | History | Technology | Health | Ramblings | Resources

Investigations

History

Technology

Environment

Health

Ramblings

Resources