Coronavirus information & resources
Treating effects of COVID-19 vax
Vaccines - What You Need To Know

Rescuing Israel: The Holocaust - Misc. Resources

Resources for further study of Zionism, World War II war crimes, historical revisionism and miscellaneous resources.

Israeli/Zionist/Jewish political influence

Jewish social and cultural influence

Jewish/Israeli human organ trafficking

Jewish/Israeli/Mossad human trafficking, sex crimes, abuse

False-flag Jewish hate crimes

Israel and 9/11

Jewish/Israeli/Mossad spying, terrorism and criminal activities, misc.

Jewish role in the Atlantic slave trade

Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Jewish Anti-Zionist organizations

Jewish history

Miscellaneous resources and recent events

Malware - It's (way) worse than you think

Relying on anti-virus software to protect your system is paramount to relying on guard rails to keep your car on the road. Here's why...

UPDATE: Since writing this article i have finally dropped Windows and moved to Linux-based operating systems which are inherently more secure in some ways (not all). I humbly suggest you consider doing the same.

My view on the subject of anti-malware/security suite software may be quite different than that of most casual computer users. I think that one of the primary keys to securing your system is a lack of stupidity rather than anti-virus software, and that relying on such products for protection is tantamount to relying on guard rails to keep your car on the road.

Fact number one: The primary method vendors of anti-virus software employ to protect against malware is by way of virus signatures, also known as 'definitions'. In order to develop a signature for a piece of malicious code, generally the vendor must be aware of its existence and since black-hat malware authors or those identifying 0-day vulnerabilities often sell their code or findings to major corporations, governments and other black-hats, they are obviously going to try to protect their secret as long as possible. This means that an exploit may exist undetected in the wild for hours, days, weeks or even years.

Fact number two: There are many viruses and software exploits that were never, are not currently, and may never be detected by any widely available, general anti-malware product. In fact, it is rather trivial to write a piece of malware that most popular anti-malware products will happily report as being 'clean'.

Fact number three: No single product can possibly protect your system against all threats, much less malware which is tailored for a specific target. On the other hand it simply is not feasible, or even possible in some cases, to run multiple anti-virus products simultaneously.

Fact number four: Everyone with an internet connection has very likely been infected with malware. If you think you are an exception, then i would posit that you simply never knew your system was/is compromised.

Fact number five: The good ol' days of malware are gone. While it was often humorous to read about or even experience your mouse cursor moving and combine that with the fact that you weren't the one moving it, much of the malware being distributed today is orders of magnitude more sophisticated. Today's malware is often designed to be as stealthy, efficient and resource friendly as possible so that it can remain completely undetected. With many millions of dollars to be earned in the malware market, the stakes are extremely high.

Video title: Zero days - Security leaks for sale - Docu - 2014

Video title: These Companies Can Legally Hack You

I'm not suggesting you throw your hands up in utter defeat, trash your anti-virus software and commence to having digi-sex without a digi-condom, but i want to make it clear that relying primarily upon anti-virus software to protect you against malware threats is a road laden with land mines, regardless of how many products you use, what they cost, what they scored on the latest Virus Bulletin test, or what bells and whistles the vendor claims it has. If there was just one, affordable anti-virus product that protected against even the majority of the threats, there wouldn't be heaps of malicious hackers getting paid to write malware any longer, yet malware is more prevalent today than ever before and more people are running anti-malware software today than ever before. What does that tell you about the overall effectiveness of the anti-virus industry? And it gets worse.

The 2016 article, Antivirus software could make your company more vulnerable, from CSO Online, points out exactly what is suggested in its title which is that using popular anti-malware products that are generally trusted can, in and of itself, get you in trouble:

Since June, researchers have found and reported several dozen serious flaws in antivirus products from vendors such as Kaspersky Lab, ESET, Avast, AVG Technologies, Intel Security (formerly McAfee) and Malwarebytes. Many of those vulnerabilities would have allowed attackers to remotely execute malicious code on computers, to abuse the functionality of the antivirus products themselves, to gain higher privileges on compromised systems and even to defeat the anti-exploitation defenses of third-party applications.

Exploiting some of those vulnerabilities required no user interaction and could have allowed the creation of computer worms -- self-propagating malware programs. In many cases, attackers would have only needed to send specially crafted email messages to potential victims, to inject malicious code into legitimate websites visited by them, or to plug in USB drives with malformed files into their computers.

This does not mean you can't protect yourself from the majority of common threats however. Not only can you do so, but you can do so quite effectively without even using an anti-virus product. I wouldn't recommend that Windows users go without any protection, but my point is that anti-virus software plays a much less significant role for the savvy computer user who relies on more effective means of protection than any software product can provide.

Security is a dish best served cold. And in layers. Here are some of the key security practices i would suggest for most anyone, especially the casual computer user who is at the greatest risk due to their lack of technical knowledge:

  • Realize what the vectors for attack are, which is basically anything you connect to your machine including flash drives, discs, modems, routers, printers, USB devices, T.V.'s and even peripherals like mice and keyboards, as well as anything that is delivered through your network connection.
  • Realize that malicious software isn't likely to be considered malicious by your anti-virus product until after it is known to exist and a signature has been developed and pushed out by the vendor, leaving you completely vulnerable in the interim. Also realize that the existence of some exploits and malware may never be known.
  • Realize that no anti-malware product on the planet is bullet-proof -- Not. Even. Close. -- and many are just plain garbage or are effectively malware themselves which vacuum up personal data and send it off to who knows where, or worse. Do some research before choosing a product.
  • By learning just a handful of good security practices, the burden of protection will naturally shift more toward the smarter you and away from your dumber anti-virus software.
  • Do not install crap-ware or software from nefarious sources and, by all means, forget about "warez" and "cracks" as failing to do so will cause doom at some point.
  • That game or joke document that's being passed around all over Facebook or by email or wherever? Let it pass.
  • Get in the habit of never opening email attachments. None. Ever. Period. The only exception is if you are expecting something important from someone you trust and even then you should not trust any attachment blindly, especially if it's an executable. Even hyperlinks can be dangerous. Your coworker or close friend could be using a little social engineering to infect you, or they could be infected themselves and not know it, or it might not be your coworker or friend at all, but rather someone impersonating them. If someone sends you something you really want to see, ask them to send a link to the webpage if possible and make sure you know where that link is pointing before clicking it (and ask them to quit sending attachments unnecessarily).
  • For many of us, our internet browser is are our primary window to the digital world. It is also a most attractive vector for attack, not only because of security holes and poorly coded extensions, but because of what websites people visit. Tighten down the security of your web browser and remove any unnecessary plugins, including Flash, Java, the Adobe PDF viewer, etc.. Most modern browsers can handle video and PDF content without plugins anyway and Java is rarely used by websites anymore.
  • Browse smart and stay away from porn sites or any other questionable sites, even if they are hugely popular. Keep in mind that you need not click or do anything on a malicious website to become infected other than simply visit it (see drive-by malware). I would also suggest dumping Microsoft Internet Explorer and replacing it with something more secure and transparent, which is basically anything other than IE.
  • As with your browser, your email client is also a huge vector for attack, so learn how to harden it by disabling JavaScript and HTML mail. As with your browser, i would suggest dumping any Microsoft email clients and replacing them with something more secure and transparent, such as Thunderbird.
  • Scan everything you download from any source with a decent anti-virus product. You don't have to run a bloated "security suite" in the background that analyzes your every click and key press and file you open as long as you work and play smart, but at least have an on-demand scanner available to manually scan all incoming downloads and email attachments.
  • If you're not sure about the integrity of a piece of software or the reputation of a website, scan it using something like the VirusTotal service, which uses a whole bunch anti-malware products to scan a single file or website URL. There are several add-ons for Firefox that make accessing VirusTotal very easy. Certainly do not rely on the over-pimped "Web of Trust" service or any other service where the data comes primarily from everyday users who lack knowledge regarding malware and rate sites based primarily upon their bias.
  • If you use only popular, mainstream software products for protection, such as Windows Defender or the Comodo Internet Security suite, etc., realize that chances may be significantly higher that malware is in play which is purposely designed to completely bypass the protection these popular products offer. The larger the following, the bigger the target.
  • Do not log on to your operating system as an administrator.
  • Keep regular backups of your data, preferably off site and encrypted, but at least on an external drive. If you have become infected, do not rely on the Windows System Restore utility since the malware may have infected those backups as well.
  • If you discover a virus, and especially if it's a Trojan, assume all your data has been compromised including any passwords, banking information, credit card numbers, documents, etc.. You should immediately unplug your computer from your modem and take action to remove the virus, change all of your passwords and notify your bank.

Again, i do not advocate running around the web with your skirts flying high and no underwear on. The trick is to find a good anti-malware product and, while there are hoards of products to choose from, there are not that many that are actually worth considering. In the past i have had extended communications with a couple of people who are apparently heavy hitters in the anti-malware industry and Bitdefender seems to be one of the better general purpose products. So is Malwarebytes Anti-Malware. I will emphasize again however that there is no single product, nor combination of products, that will protect you from all threats.

Personally i don't run a resident virus scanner at all any more, but i do use the Emsisoft Commandline Scanner which is an on-demand scanner (you have to run it manually) to scan everything i download. It is a general purpose anti-malware tool that is probably about as good as they come and it's free for personal use. Also known by it's executable, a2cmd, the Emsisoft scanner is a hybrid of both the Emsisoft and Bitdefender products.

While i have been infected a couple of times back in the day, to my knowledge i haven't been infected with any malicious software in the last 15 years or so since i started learning more about computer security. I am very careful about what i download and install, what websites i visit and where i allow JavaScript or browser plugins to run and what email attachments i choose to open. I have taken measures to harden my browser and email client and i use a non-Microsoft firewall and anti-virus products. I never plug anything into my everyday machine that i don't own, especially flash memory. Still, i feel very threatened by the potential that something will slip by my defenses, but my paranoia plays a key role in keeping me infection free... at least to the best of my knowledge.

Good luck. You'll need it.

Dealing With The Fuzz

Getting stopped by the police is an uncomfortable event for many people. Not knowing and exercising your rights can quickly turn an uncomfortable event into a catastrophic one.

"The history of totalitarian regimes is reflected in the evolution and perfection of the instruments of terror and more especially the police." --  Carl J. Friedrich

There you are, innocently driving along, when suddenly you notice that dreaded flashing light flickering in your rear-view. Perhaps you were speeding, or maybe you rolled through a stop sign. Whatever the case, one of the first questions you are likely to be asked is, "Do you know why i stopped you?". It's an all too familiar question when you are pulled over for a traffic violation, but why exactly does the officer ask it?

This question is actually a tactic used by police to manipulate you into admitting your guilt. By admitting that, yes, maybe you were going a little too fast, you have incriminated yourself and your answer can thus be used as evidence against you should you decide to dispute the charge in court. Secondly, you are now virtually guaranteed of being cited or arrested for whatever wrongdoing you just admitted to.

Cops are sneaky. While you are legally obligated to not deceive the police, they are legally permitted to deceive you in order to obtain a confession or trip you up in some way. While it may seem more ethical to be honest and admit your wrongdoing, keep in mind that the police operate under a different set of rules. You don't have to lie, nor should you, but not answering their questions is not lying and is perfectly within your rights.

RULE #1: Never talk to the police

While you may be legally obligated to disclose your identity in some cases, you are never obligated to answer any other questions. Whether you are innocent or guilty does not matter; anything you say may be used against you and so the only thing you can possibly do, in most circumstances, is undermine your position by volunteering information regardless of how certain you are that such information may benefit you.

If you are an honest, ethical person and you know you are guilty and you wish to accept responsibility for your actions, fine, you can always choose to do so after the initial encounter. There is no reason to give law enforcement any information that may add to your troubles.

Also see the document 'Traffic Stops' on the FreedomTaker website which you can print in order to have a copy to hand to police.

RULE #2: Remain calm

Always remain calm and courteous. Never raise your voice or make any quick moves or threatening gestures. You want to play a non-threatening, submissive role, but you want to do so without sacrificing your rights. You want to allow the officer to think they are in control which, in turn, will give you greater control over the outcome. The instant you show anger or threaten or intimidate the officer, you not only relinquish control, but you greatly increase the chance of an unfavorable outcome, especially when dealing with an aggressive cop.

RULE #3: Know your rights

You are never obligated to consent to a search of your person or your property. In many states, but not all, you are not even required to produce identification unless you are suspected of committing a crime. You are not legally obligated to give the police permission to do anything, nor are you compelled to answer any of their questions, but you may ask questions that they may be obligated to answer. For example, if there is any doubt as to why you were pulled over during a traffic stop, simply ask the officer why you were stopped. A polite "Hello officer. May i ask why you stopped me?" will do. If there is doubt as to whether you're being detained, simply ask the officer if you are being detained or are free to go. Unless you are being detained, you may end the encounter any time you choose, but you should always confirm whether you are free to go to prevent any possibility of a misunderstanding. Contrary to what may be popular belief, police officers are often ignorant of the law.

RULE #4: Never resist

Never refuse to comply with an officers orders, regardless of whether those orders are legal. The only questionable exception to this rule is when you are certain that the order is unlawful and will very likely result in the officer physically attacking you if you do not comply and you are reasonably certain your situation will be improved by resisting. In such a case you should carefully consider the consequences of your refusal before disobeying an order, but even for these very rare occasions it is highly questionable as to whether you -- usually the one without the gun -- should resist a trained and armed police officer, especially if they are being aggressive. While you are obviously not obligated to follow an illegal order, we can clearly see why we may choose to do so regardless.

RULE #5: Record the encounter

Like the child who doesn't steal a cookie when you're watching, law enforcement officers are also more likely to observe the law if they know their actions are being monitored. Regardless of what the officer may tell you, you are legally permitted to record encounters with the police. For your own protection you should always record every encounter with the police and, though you should not make a big deal of it by positioning your camera right in the officers face, which may provoke an aggressive response, you should probably not make a secret of it either, although a second, hidden camera is certainly a great idea. A record of the encounter will prove to be invaluable as evidence if you are forced to defend yourself in court or choose to initiate a legal action against the police. There are several apps for mobile devices that are designed specifically to record police encounters. If you are not able to record the encounter, ask a bystander if any are near. You also have a right to request any video recorded by the police.

If an aggressive officer demands that you delete the recording or tries to take it from you, understand that your device may not be confiscated without a warrant, but also be aware that they may not know or care about the law, especially if tensions are high. If it seems likely the officer may use violence in order to confiscate your property if you refuse, let them have it. In the event the officer deletes your recording, or forces you to do so, don't sweat it. The files on your storage media should remain intact as long as they are only deleted and not later overwritten and the storage media is not formatted. In such a case, and as soon as possible after the encounter, power off the device and when you get home use a utility such as PhotoRec to recover the "deleted" files.

Regardless of any threats the police may issue, you are legally allowed to share your recording publicly and this option is well worth considering when you know your rights were violated. Public pressure resulting from videos of aggressive police encounters have had a significant impact in many instances.

Lastly, if you disagree with my advice, then understand that it's not really my advice. Much of it comes from a comical, fast-talking lawyer and his detective accomplice.

Don't Talk to the Police

Study resources

Read and understand the Rules of Engagement for Interacting with Police by the Rutherford Institute.

CLDC Know Your Rights Activist Training

"Failure to Obey" Documentary on Checkpoint Refusal

Below are some examples of how to handle an encounter with law enforcement officers.

Know Your Rights: Police Checkpoints

How To Survive Police Interrogation, Cops At Your Door "I Don't Answer Questions"

Homeland Security Checkpoint: Video Blog

How to Refuse a DUI Checkpoint

Attorney/Uber Driver Tutorial on Checkpoints

10 Rules for Dealing with Police

Law Student Schools Policeman On His Gun Rights

Further resources:

101 Reasons: Liberty Lives in New Hampshire

This is a documentary film about the New Hampshire Free State Project.

This is a really cool documentary about the New Hampshire Free State Project which is largely about restoring personal liberty and limited government in the New England "live free or die" state. The basic goal of the Free State Project is to convince 20,000 liberty lovers to move to New Hampshire in order to have a greater impact in its government.

From the film description:

"101 Reasons: Liberty Lives in New Hampshire" is a documentary adaptation of the Free State Project's list of 101 Reasons to Move to New Hampshire, which was written in 2002 by Michele Dumas.

The FSP is an effort to move 20,000 liberty-minded people to a low populated state that has an existing pro-freedom culture. In 2003, participants of the FSP voted for the "Live Free or Die" state, New Hampshire, as its destination.

For over 12 years the 101 Reasons list has helped inspire thousands of activists and entrepreneurs to sign up for the FSP and continue New Hampshire's reputation as a beacon for liberty.

To view the Statement of Intent of the Free State Project, visit https://www.fsp.org/nh/.