The Lunacy Of The Entertainment Industry

When Napster was killed by the entertainment industry, i’m sure they thought they had won a decisive victory over us music sharing “thieves”. Before Napster, this same bunch of clowns tried to kill the VCR industry and, that too, went over like a lead balloon. Now it’s the resilient Pirate Bay, whose website has been taken down as the result of yet another raid. Finally, a real victory for the entertainment industry, right?

A recent TorrentFreak article, “How To Learn Absolutely Nothing In Fifteen Years,” By The Copyright Industry, drives a big fat nail in the prehistoric approach of the industry to stop “illegal” file sharing. In its utter failure to adapt, mush less comprehend, the world wide web and how people want to — and will —  use it to share and distribute content, the industry is alienating its customers and driving a stake through its own heart. Even many artists are beginning to realize that there are alternatives to utilizing the services provided by the industry which provide for greater freedom in many ways.

“The copyright industry, having a strong and persistent tradition of trying to obliterate every new technology for the past century, moved to crush Napster. It vanished. DirectConnect, LimeWire, and Kazaa — slightly more decentralized sharing mechanisms – popped up almost immediately, and BitTorrent a year or so later.”

Seriously, how difficult is it to realize and understand that, given computers, software, the internet and human ingenuity, the old business model of trying to suppress innovation and freedom is eventually going to result in doom? Not that i care, for ‘the industry’ really doesn’t have that much that i want. If all the Madonna’s, Lady Gaga’s and Justin Bieber’s all suddenly evaporate because the ‘the industry’ is too dumb to realize the Earth isn’t flat and drives themselves into bankruptcy, so what? Who cares? Does that mean real artists will quit producing art? Does it mean that there are no other ways to monetize?

Regarding the [probably temporary] destruction of The Pirate Bay, TorrentFreak closes their article with this:

“So in a way, this was welcome. We need that innovation. We need to not grow complacent. We all need to stay ahead of the crumbling monopolies – a dying tiger is dangerous, even when it’s obviously insane. But The Pirate Bay’s legacy will never die, just like Napster’s legacy won’t.

In the meantime, the copyright industry is a case study in how to really insist on not learning a damn thing from your own monumental mistakes in fifteen full years.”

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